Long-standing rumor holds that actress Jamie Lee Curtis acknowledged in an interview that she was born with both male and female sex organs.

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Jamie Lee Curtis had to undergo surgery after birth to become legally female after being born an hermaphrodite. This is a story that's been circulating around Hollywood for years.

According to a frequently repeated whisper within the Academy, Jamie Lee Curtis acknowledged that she was born intersex (the preferred medical term for persons of ambiguous gender, replacing the outdated term "hermaphrodite").

Are you sure?

.Despite common belief, Curtis has never publicly acknowledged such a fact, and she has repeatedly declined to comment on this rumor. Moreover, her physicians - even if they had something to say - are bound by laws surrounding patient-physician confidentiality.


The rumor is often credited as true by university professors with expertise in intersexuality (especially those who specialize in the subject).

Ok, so we just don't know.Nonetheless, this rumor is widely spread.

Her parents are Tony Curtis and Janet Leigh.During Jamie Lee's birth, her father was a handsome leading man whom female moviegoers couldn't help but fall in love with.Her mother was a renowned actress and a beauty.Kelly Lee was born in 1956 and Jamie Lee was born in 1958 as a result of their union.

Curtis and Leigh were one of Hollywood's hottest couples in their time, two successful, ambitious, and famous people who appeared to have it all -- including a happy marriage and two kids. .The fox describes grapes hanging out of his reach as sour, and so might people enraged by the beautiful people make up a rumor that, at least in their minds, reduces the stars to size.

Two facts lend credence to Jamie Lee's origins as a man and woman. .Janet Leigh explained why she chose the name:

.works?works? She also thought the same thing about Jamie.

This debunks the notion that "Jamie Lee" was so designated because of medical issues that only became apparent after the child was born.Curtis was born before medical technologies were developed which enabled the identification of fetuses with dual genders.

Additionally, Ms. Curtis' own children, her adopted children, lend credence to the rumor.While couples choose adoption over natural progeny for a variety of reasons, it is true that the operation necessary to "correct" intersex traits in a female infant would leave her unable to bear children.


It varies from having an additional Y chromosome to having a mixed genital set.It is generally (but not always) surgical in nature to treat cases of blatant intersexuality, which involves reconstructing the infant in order to end up with a child that is completely male or female in accordance with its gender.In addition to hormones, medical science also allows some modifications to be made to this.It is possible to create an appearance of sexual characteristics that are less ambiguous; however, fully functioning reproductive organs cannot.

A recognized expert in this field of study, Dr. Anne Fausto-Sterling, found that approximately one-half to 2% of all births do not strictly fall within the strict definition of all-male or all-female, regardless of whether the child appears "normal." In order to reach her numbers, she considered both mild and the most severe cases of intersexuality.Children with mixed genitalia are estimated to occur one out of every 2,000 to 3,000 births, or 0.033 to 0.05 percent.

Sexual ambiguity is described by many technical terms, such as testicular feminization, transgenderism, and androgen insensitivity syndrome. Rather than convey these terms here, we point readers to the "Additional Information" section of this page for further discussion of these subjects.

Intersexuality does exist; some children are ambiguously sexed at birth. .By relying on the first, one is essentially claiming the Atlantic Ocean is also proof that a particular ship sank in it.

This rumor simply embodies the skewed importance we give to any matter related to sexuality.

INFO: Intersex: The Body, The Self (Harvard Medicine, Winter 2020)